WSU Extension

Hortsense

Weeds
 
Annual bluegrass 
Barnyardgrass 
Bentgrass, creeping 
Bermudagrass 
Birdfoot Trefoil 
Bittercress (Shotweed, Hairy bittercress) 
Bittersweet nightshade (European bittersweet) 
Black medic 
Blackberry (Himalayan, Evergreen, Pacific) 
Blue mustard (Purple mustard, Tenella mustard) 
Brackenfern, western 
Buffalobur 
Bull thistle 
Buttercup, creeping 
Butterfly bush 
Canada thistle 
Catchweed bedstraw (Cleavers) 
Catsear, common (False dandelion) 
Chickweed, common and mouseear 
Clover 
Comfrey 
Crabgrass 
Creeping Jenny 
Dandelion 
Dock (Curly, Broadleaf) 
Dodder 
Downy brome (Cheatgrass, Downy chess) 
Dwarf mistletoes 
English daisy (Lawn daisy) 
English ivy 
Field bindweed (Wild morningglory) 
Field pennycress (Fanweed) 
Flixweed 
Foxtail (Green, Yellow, Bristly) 
Garden loosestrife 
Giant hogweed 
Goldenrods 
Ground ivy 
Groundsel, common 
Hawkweeds 
Hedge bindweed 
Henbit 
Herb Robert (Robert geranium, stinky Bob) 
Horsetails (Scouringrush) 
Horseweed (Marestail) 
Knapweeds 
Knotweeds (Bohemian, Giant, Japanese, Himalayan) 
Kochia 
Lambsquarters, common 
Lesser celandine 
Liverworts 
Mallow, common (Cheeseweed, Buttonweed) 
Nightshades 
Oxalis (Creeping woodsorrel) 
Parrotfeather and Eurasian watermilfoil 
Pineappleweed 
Plantain (Broadleaf, Buckhorn) 
Poison hemlock 
Poison ivy and Poison oak 
Pokeweed 
Prickly lettuce (China lettuce) 
Prostrate knotweed 
Puncturevine (Tackweed, Goathead) 
Purple deadnettle (Red deadnettle) 
Purple loosestrife (Purple lythrum) 
Purslane, common 
Quackgrass 
Red sorrel (Sheep sorrel) 
Redroot pigweed (Rough pigweed) 
Redstem filaree (Stork's bill, Crane's bill) 
Reed canarygrass 
Russian thistle (Tumbleweed) 
Ryegrass, annual (Italian ryegrass) 
Salsify (Goatsbeard) 
Scotch broom 
Shepherd's-purse 
Smartweeds 
Sowthistle, annual and perennial 
Speedwells 
Spurges (Prostrate spurges) 
St. Johnswort, common (Goatweed, Klamathweed) 
Stinging nettle 
Tansy ragwort 
Tumblemustard (Jim Hill mustard) 
Velvetgrass (Common velvetgrass) 
Velvetleaf 
Water primrose 
Waterhemlock, western 
Wild carrot (Queen Anne's lace) 
Yellow nutsedge 



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Caption: Queen Anne's Lace
Photo by: Jrosenberry1 Creative Commons Alike 4.0
  
Weeds : Wild carrot (Queen Anne's lace) : Daucus carota
(revision date: 3/17/2021)

Family: Apiaceae
Cycle: Biennial
Plant Type: Broadleaf

Use Integrated Pest Management (IPM) for successful weed management.

Biology
Wild Carrot (also known as Queen Anne’s Lace) is an upright, tap rooted herb, reaching 1 to 4 feet tall. It may occur as an annual or short-lived perennial. The species is often a biennial that bears a rosette of leaves its first season. The entire plant is covered with coarse, stiff hairs. Flowers are small, white and borne in compound flat-topped umbels. The umbels are 2 to 4 inches in diameter. They have purple or pinkish flowers in the center. Leaves are fern-like with small toothed leaflets. The segments are linear, or lance shaped. Wild carrot reproduces by seed. Estimates of seed production vary from 1,000 to 40,000 seeds per plant. Wild carrot is similar to other plants in the Apiaceae (carrot) family when young. From a distance, wild carrot (Daucus carota) may be confused with poison hemlock, although wild carrot is smaller and doesn’t have purple blotches on the stems. Wild carrot is listed as a Washington State Class C noxious weed. It outcompetes native grasses for resources. It can taint milk if dairy cows ingest large amounts. It may be mildly toxic to livestock. Wild carrot may cause poor seed production with commercial varieties through hybridization.
Habitat
Queen Anne’s Lace is found in meadows, pastures, roadsides, and waste places.

Management Options


Non-Chemical Management
  • Hand-pulling or mowing, during the first year when the plants are 7 - 10 inches tall, can be effective.
  • Establishing and maintaining healthy stands of native, desirable vegetation can reduce wild carrot infestations.
  • Since wild carrot and commercial carrot are the same species, classical biological control is not a viable option.
Select non-chemical management options as your first choice!

Landscape areas
    Turf areas
    • products containing MCPA
    Bare ground areas
      Images

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      Caption: Queen Anne's Lace
      Photo by: Jrosenberry1 Creative Commons Alike 4.0
      Caption: Queen Anne's Lace
      Photo by: Bernell
      Caption: Queen Anne's Lace
      Photo by: https://www.pxfuel.com/en/free-photo-xwlcd