WSU Extension

Hortsense

Tomato
 
Disease
Anthracnose 
Blossom-end rot 
Catface 
Curly top (Beet curly top virus) 
Late blight 
Mosaic viruses 
Physiological leaf roll 
Sunscald 
Verticillium wilt 
White mold 
Insect
Aphids 
Brown marmorated stink bug 
Colorado potato beetle 
Flea beetles 
Slugs 
Spider mites 
Tomato hornworm 



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Caption: Interior stem showing white fungal growth and black sclerotia
Photo by: R.S. Byther
  
Tomato : White mold
(revision date: 6/6/2014)


Biology
White mold is caused by a fungus. It typically attacks dead flower petals or dead leaves, then spreads into living tissues. The infection often starts in branch crotches or at the base of stems. Initial symptoms may include a rapidly spreading soft rot. Affected tissues turn gray and may be covered with a mass of cottony, white fungal growth. Hard, black fungal structures (measuring 1/4" to 1") are often produced on the cottony growth and inside the affected stems. Infected stems may be tan, then eventually turn a bleached, bone-like white. Disease development is favored by long periods of cool, wet weather.
Management Options


Non-Chemical Management
  • Plant in well-drained soils.
  • Avoid overhead irrigation.
  • Space plantings to improve air circulation, particularly around the base of the plants.
Select non-chemical management options as your first choice!

Chemical Management

None recommended

Images

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Caption: Interior stem showing white fungal growth and black sclerotia
Photo by: R.S. Byther