WSU Extension

Hortsense

Weeds
 
Annual bluegrass 
Barnyardgrass 
Bentgrass, creeping 
Bermudagrass 
Bittercress (Shotweed, Hairy bittercress) 
Bittersweet nightshade (European bittersweet) 
Black medic 
Blackberry (Himalayan, Evergreen, Pacific) 
Blue mustard (Purple mustard, Tenella mustard) 
Brackenfern, western 
Buffalobur 
Bull thistle 
Buttercup, creeping 
Canada thistle 
Catchweed bedstraw (Cleavers) 
Catsear, common (False dandelion) 
Chickweed, common and mouseear 
Clover 
Comfrey 
Crabgrass 
Creeping Jenny 
Dandelion 
Dock (Curly, Broadleaf) 
Dodder 
Downy brome (Cheatgrass, Downy chess) 
Dwarf mistletoes 
English daisy (Lawn daisy) 
English ivy 
Field bindweed (Wild morningglory) 
Field pennycress (Fanweed) 
Flixweed 
Foxtail (Green, Yellow, Bristly) 
Garden loosestrife 
Giant hogweed 
Goldenrods 
Groundsel, common 
Hawkweeds 
Hedge bindweed 
Henbit 
Herb Robert (Robert geranium, stinky Bob) 
Horsetails (Scouringrush) 
Horseweed (Marestail) 
Knapweeds 
Knotweeds (Bohemian, Giant, Japanese, Himalayan) 
Kochia 
Lambsquarters, common 
Lesser celandine 
Liverworts 
Mallow, common (Cheeseweed, Buttonweed) 
Nightshades 
Oxalis (Creeping woodsorrel) 
Parrotfeather and Eurasian watermilfoil 
Pineappleweed 
Plantain (Broadleaf, Buckhorn) 
Poison hemlock 
Poison ivy and Poison oak 
Pokeweed 
Prickly lettuce (China lettuce) 
Prostrate knotweed 
Puncturevine (Tackweed, Goathead) 
Purple deadnettle (Red deadnettle) 
Purple loosestrife (Purple lythrum) 
Purslane, common 
Quackgrass 
Red sorrel (Sheep sorrel) 
Redroot pigweed (Rough pigweed) 
Redstem filaree (Stork's bill, Crane's bill) 
Reed canarygrass 
Russian thistle (Tumbleweed) 
Ryegrass, annual (Italian ryegrass) 
Salsify (Goatsbeard) 
Scotch broom 
Shepherd's-purse 
Smartweeds 
Sowthistle, annual and perennial 
Speedwells 
Spurges (Prostrate spurges) 
St. Johnswort, common (Goatweed, Klamathweed) 
Stinging nettle 
Tansy ragwort 
Tumblemustard (Jim Hill mustard) 
Velvetgrass (Common velvetgrass) 
Velvetleaf 
Water primrose 
Waterhemlock, western 
Yellow nutsedge 



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Caption: Creeping Jenny flower
Photo by: H. Zell
  
Weeds : Creeping Jenny :
(revision date: 10/28/2020)

Family: Primulaceae
Cycle: Perennial
Plant Type: Evergreen

Use Integrated Pest Management (IPM) for successful weed management.

Biology
Lysimachia nummularia, commonly called moneywort or creeping Jenny, is a low-growing, creeping ground cover which forms a leafy mat only 2-4" tall. Roots where leaf nodes come in contact with the soil. Thrives in damp soils which will often kill off other types of ground covers. It features rounded, slightly ruffled, leaves (to 3/4" diameter). Profuse, cup-shaped, bright yellow flowers (to 3/4" across) appear in early summer. Tolerates limited foot traffic. Plants spread by rhizomes and self-seeding in optimum growing conditions to form large colonies. Stems may root where leaf nodes touch the ground. Plants tend to be less invasive if grown in lean, somewhat dry soils, however best performance is in moist fertile soils.
Habitat
Lysimachia nummularia can be found in a variety of different habitat types; however, it grows most vigorously and poses the biggest threat in moist areas such as wet meadows, swamps, floodplain forests, stream banks, bottoms, ditches, roadsides and along the banks of small water bodies. It can form a mat-like growth capable of excluding more desirable native plant species. It is native to Europe but is now found across the United States and Canada.

Management Options


Non-Chemical Management
  • Maintaining a healthy planting or turf area to provide competition will prevent weed establishment.
  • If Creeping Jenny is established in your lawn it may take two seasons to eradicate it.
  • The plant can be hand pulled where practical. All stems and stem fragments should be removed from the area to prevent the stems from rooting again in the soil. Prolonged submergence will kill Creeping Jenny. At restoration sites, it can be controlled by establishing native grasses to shade it out. Mowing is not effective since Creeping Jenny adheres closely to the ground due to its many rooting nodes.
Select non-chemical management options as your first choice!

Images

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Caption: Creeping Jenny flower
Photo by: H. Zell
Caption: Creeping Jenny close-up
Photo by: D. Stang
Caption: Creeping Jenny
Photo by: D. Stang