WSU Extension

Hortsense

Tomato
 
Disease
Anthracnose 
Blossom-end rot 
Catface 
Curly top (Beet curly top virus) 
Late blight 
Mosaic viruses 
Physiological leaf roll 
Sunscald 
Verticillium wilt 
White mold 
Insect
Aphids 
Brown marmorated stink bug 
Colorado potato beetle 
Flea beetles 
Slugs 
Spider mites 
Tomato hornworm 



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Caption: Sunscald
Photo by: F. Buajaila
  
Tomato : Sunscald
(revision date: 8/24/2015)


Biology
Sunscald of tomato fruits frequently occurs in hot, dry weather, but may occur whenever green fruit is suddenly exposed to direct sun. The sunward side of green fruit develops a yellowish, light brown, or white leathery patch, which may become wrinkled or blisterlike as the fruit matures. On ripe tomatoes, the damaged areas appear as flattened, grayish-white patches with a papery texture. The spots are sometimes attacked by rot organisms, causing fruit decay.
Management Options


Non-Chemical Management
  • Plant varieties with good foliage density.
  • Use care when pruning plants, so that fruits are not suddenly exposed to the sun.
  • Prevent or control diseases which cause leaf loss.
Select non-chemical management options as your first choice!

Chemical Management

None recommended

Images

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Caption: Sunscald
Photo by: F. Buajaila
Caption: Sunscald
Photo by: C. Miles