WSU Extension

Hortsense

Lettuce
 
Disease
Anthracnose 
Aster yellows 
Beet western yellows virus 
Bottom rot 
Damping-off 
Downy mildew 
Lettuce big vein virus 
Insect
Aphids 
Slugs 



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Caption: Lettuce big vein virus symptoms
Photo by: R.S. Byther
  
Lettuce : Lettuce big vein virus
(revision date: 6/3/2014)


Biology
Lettuce Big Vein Virus is transmitted by a fungus which inhabits the roots. Virus infection causes tissues next to veins to become clear, resulting in an enlarged appearance of the veins. The vein clearing becomes more severe with time. Leaves become puckered and mottled in appearance. Outer leaves may grow more rigidly upright than normal leaves. The heads may be loose and smaller than normal or slow in developing. The disease is more prevalent in poorly-drained soils and causes more severe symptoms in cool weather (below 60 degrees F). The virus can persist in the resting spores of the fungus for ten or more years.
Management Options


Non-Chemical Management
  • Do not plant lettuce in infested soils, when possible.
  • Do not plant cool-season lettuce where Big Vein has been a problem in the past.
  • Plant in well-drained soils.
  • Do not overwater, particularly when temperatures are cool.
  • Remove plant debris from the garden. Destroy or discard (do not compost) diseased materials.
Select non-chemical management options as your first choice!

Chemical Management

None recommended

Images

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Caption: Lettuce big vein virus symptoms
Photo by: R.S. Byther
Caption: Lettuce big vein virus symptoms
Photo by: R.S. Byther
Caption: Lettuce big vein virus symptoms: diseased (left) vs. healthy
Photo by: R.S. Byther
Caption: Lettuce big vein virus symptoms
Photo by: R.S. Byther