WSU Extension

Hortsense

Lawn and Turf
 
Disease
2,4-D damage 
Algae 
Anthracnose/Basal crown rot 
Brown blight 
Brown patch 
Curvularia blight (Fading out) 
Dog injury 
Dollar spot 
Fairy ring and mushrooms 
Leaf spot 
Microdochium patch (Pink snow mold) 
Moss 
Necrotic ringspot 
Powdery mildew 
Pythium crown and root rot 
Red thread 
Rusts 
Septoria leaf spot (Tip blight) 
Slime molds 
Take-all patch 
Thatch 
Typhula blight (Gray snow mold) 
Yellow patch 
Insect
Ants 
Billbugs 
Chinch bugs 
Cutworms 
European crane fly 
Leafhoppers 
Moles 
Sod webworm 



print version| pdf version| email url    
Caption: Leafhopper
Photo by: K. Grey
  
Lawn and Turf : Leafhoppers
(revision date: 3/12/2014)


Biology
Leafhoppers are slender, somewhat wedge-shaped insects that hop or fly just above the lawn surface when disturbed. They are variously-colored, from yellowish to green to gray-brown. The wings are typically held roof-like above the body, which is 1/4" or less in length. Nymphs (immature leafhoppers) are similar to adults but lack wings. Nymphs and adults feed on grass leaves and stems, causing blades to appear mottled or streaked with white. Damaged areas in lawns appear bleached or dried.
Management Options

Non-Chemical Management
  • Several insects feed on leafhoppers including damsel bugs, assassin bugs, and parasitic wasps. When possible, avoid use of broad-spectrum insecticides which kill beneficial insects.
Select non-chemical management options as your first choice!

Chemical Management

None recommended

Images

+ Show larger images

 
Caption: Leafhopper
Photo by: K. Grey